Ann Hardy: NOAPS Master Artist

NOAPS Hardy Texas, My Texas, Oil, 25 x 25, private collection

“Texas, My Texas”, Oil, 25×25, Private Collection

The rhythmic pattern and bright but soothing colors in “Texas, My Texas” exude a feeling of love for the land.  As the flowers come forward, we are invited to stand in the landscape, and just for a moment understand the artist’s attachment to the scene, and the earth’s ability to produce beauty in any condition.

NOAPS Hardy Blue Butterfly and Geraniums , Oil, 16 x 12, Holder Dane Gallery  “Blue Butterfly and Geraniums”, 16×12, Oil, Holder Dane Gallery, Grapevine, TX.

Ann Hardy has been a creator most of her life, though admits coming to painting later.  In her mid-thirties, a desire for an Arabian horse led her to begin her painting career, selling the paintings at art shows.  She was successful from the beginning, and by 1973 was able to settle on 20 acres of Texas land with a home, a barn, and her Arabian horse.

NOAPS Hardy Honeycrisp Harvest  “Honeycrisp Harvest”, 18×24, Oil, Private Collection

Ann’s college degree in Christian Education didn’t offer many art classes, but she more than made up for it by attending many, many workshops with artists whom she admired.  Even now, she attends college taking graduate art classes, with the purpose of continued growth and contact with fellow artists.

Ann’s style of painting reflects her favorite Master Artists: Fechin, Sargent and Sorolla.  Just as these masters were able to catch a glimpse of light or a fleeting moment, so too has Ann done in her work.  She admits to a “propensity to try everything, (and) have had to focus and refocus and refocus.”  But it is with the oils that she has achieved her greatest success.

NOAPS Hardy Samovar and Reflective Cup , Oil, 16 x 20, private collection  “Samovar and Reflective Cup”, 16×20, Oil, Private Collection

Her work in oils is done on smooth Belgian canvas, using Rosemary brushes, and a palette that consists of Cadmium yellow light, Cadmium yellow dark, Cadmium orange, Medium red, Permanent Alizarin Crimson, Ultramarine Blue dark, Sky Blue, Viridian, Transparent Oxide Red, and yellow ochre.  When working, she looks for interesting shapes with a good value range.  She does a sketch on her support, then starts the painting with a block in of the darks in the correct value.  She then works from the center of interest out.  Ann works en plein air, with photo reference, and from a still life set-up with a single light source.

Ann has some very good advice to beginning painters: “do your research on the workshop teacher, as a good painter may not be the best teacher, and the opposite can also be true”.  She also advises to “determine what they want to achieve (hobby, compete in exhibitions, earn a living, etc.) …that there is no perfect time to get started, just do it!”

NOAPS Hardy Italian Gentleman., Oil, 12 X 16, Private Collectionjpg  “Italian Gentleman”, 12×16, Oil, Private Collection

Ann Hardy has won numerous awards, most notably earning 2nd and 3rd awards in the Oil Painters of America National Exhibitions, and 1st place painting in the National American Women Artists Show.  She is also a Master and Signature member in six art organizations: Oil Painters of America, the National Oil & Acrylic Painters’ Society, American Impressionist Society, American Women Artists, the Outdoor Painters Society, and Tex and Neighbors.  NOAPS is proud to count Ann among our Master Artists.

Ann’s artwork is represented by Davis and Blevins (the Main Street Gallery) in Saint Jo, TX; Holder Dane Gallery in Grapevine, TX; Southwest Gallery in Dallas, TX; and Weiler House Fine Art Gallery in Ft. Worth, TX.

To view more of Ann Hardy’s work, visit her website at www.AnnHardy.com.

Written by Patricia Tribastone, NOAPS Blog Director

 

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